What is a “Service Dog?”

There are Service Dogs and Support Dogs, such as therapy dogs, emotional support dogs, etc. The difference between a Service Dog and Support Dog is that a Service Dog is trained to perform a specific task to help their handlers. In most jurisdictions, it is legal for service dogs to be in places that dogs are prohibited, while support dogs are not afforded the same privileges. Here are 10 types of service dogs.

FASD Service Dogs 

An emerging category of service dogs, these dogs support children who were exposed to alcohol prenatally and have been diagnosed with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). These children may have physical and mental difficulties, as well as behavioral problems and learning disabilities. According to 4 Paws for Ability, FASD dogs are trained similarly to autism service dogs.  

risdictions, it is legal for service dogs to be in places that dogs are prohibited, while support dogs are not afforded the same privileges. Here are 10 types of service dogs. 

Autism Support Dogs 

For kids on the autism spectrum, these dogs provide a sense of predictability as the children navigate social settings. The dogs can be a big help for kids who have trouble connecting with classmates. The dog acts as an icebreaker in social situations. They improve the child’s quality of life by reducing isolation and comforting the child in stressful times. These dogs are also trained to keep children from running away and can track children if they do runoff.

Seizure Alert Dogs 

Seizure alert dogs are one of the controversial types of service dogs. They react with a specific type of behavior right before the human has a seizure. The ability to alert to seizures seems to be a natural ability for a small number of dogs, although some neurology experts say there is no reliable evidence to suggest that dogs can reliably predict seizures. Many patients, families and trainers insist their dogs do accurately predict oncoming seizures. 

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