National Poll (UK) Shows Support For Access To Key Information For Diagnosis Of FASD

(London) – A new poll shows that 91% of women and 85% of men believe that children should have access to information about harm done to them in utero to help them get diagnosis and support (only 1% of women disagreed or strongly disagreed and 2% of men). 85% of women and 74% of men believe drinking alcohol in pregnancy should be noted as part of routine antenatal care (only 5% of women and 6% of men disagreed or strongly disagreed). These finding show massive public support exists for the intent of the draft Quality Standard on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) being produced by NICE, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. FASD is a relatively unknown neurodevelopmental condition which experts say is more prevalent than autism but often undiagnosed.

According to Joanna Buckard of the National Organisation for FASD, which commissioned the poll, “This poll strongly suggests that framing of these discussions is important. While we understand the limits of this sort of poll, these results reflect what we’ve been hearing from members of the public and experts for years. Information about exposure to alcohol in pregnancy is the first step toward diagnosis and is needed for the more than 90% on the FASD spectrum without the distinctive facial features. Every child with a disability has the right to the correct diagnosis. Having the right diagnosis can be the key to understanding and support. This can be life changing.”

Dr Cassie Jackson of the Centre for FASD in Suffolk said, “Lacking this key information when children come for assessment can mean the difference between receiving a diagnosis that will facilitate appropriate support from services moving forward; and continuing undiagnosed, leaving children and young people potentially misunderstood for a lifetime. Accurate documenting of alcohol use during pregnancy is absolutely necessary for timely and accurate diagnosis.”

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